Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time

{reconnect with nature}

A community of like minded people who see the value in understanding and appreciating the natural world.  Each week we step outside, find some nature, photograph it and learn something about it to share with others.  Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons changing is all you need and together we'll reconnect with nature, one photograph at time.
 Read more about the Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time idea here.
 
 
 
 
Staghorn fern (Platycerium superbum)
Another find from work to share with you this week.  
Truth be told, l probably don't appreciate how lucky l am to work somewhere that has such lovely surrounds. There's many natural areas around our work where staff can walk and eat their lunch.  The gardens are great and contain many wonderful things to discover, like this massive Staghorn fern.
Staghorn ferns are native to the warm, humid forests of eastern Australia, and are epiphytes - meaning they grow (non-parasitically) upon another plants, such as on a tree trunk or fallen log.  They get their moisture from falling rain, and feed on anything that falls into them or accumulates around them.  Often this is the falling leaves from the tree on which they are growing.  
The specimen above is massive, it was well over a meter wide and probably at least two meters long.  And if you notice on some of the down facing fronds the reddish brown tinge? That's the ferns spores and how they reproduce. Apparently the dust like spores float through the air until they colonise a tree with rough bark. 
Is it just me, or how unbelievably cool is it that massive plant like this can grow from a small spore, floating through the air.

Hope you've all found something amazing in nature this week, looking forward to seeing your photos.

 


7 comments:

  1. Wow you have some real cool nature finds where you live, totally cool. And yes I have now let it out of the bag...I am a total nature geek :)

    That is amazing, and so beautiful! Thanks for sharing.

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  2. What a fascinating fern, I've never seen anything like it!

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  3. Was für eine herrliche Pflanze.
    Diese Ausmaße gibt es nur in der freien Natur !
    Hier in Deutschland kennt man sie nur im Blumentopf und auch recht selten.
    Danke für die genaue Information.
    Mein Beitrag zeigt einen Querschnitt durch die erwachende Natur.
    Herzlichen Gruß
    Jutta aus Deutschland

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  4. Amazing plants in that country of yours! This has been and continues to be such a great learning experience! Thanks! xx

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  5. Crazy cool Chrisy! I believe I saw these at the large arboretum and conservatory that we visited in early March. They are so out of this world looking. Ephiphytes are really amazing - I love seeing Spanish Moss when we travel down South.

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  6. What an amazing plant & it is huge. We can buy Staghorn Ferns for indoor use only, I do wonder how a summer outside would suit it. My connection with nature this weeks has been wide & plentiful. I saw, up close but safe, my first live porcupine - amazing the quills on the tail. I also had encounters with white tailed deer, a skunk, several grass snakes, ground hogs, wild bunnies & coyotes. Thankfully the bunnies, deer & ground hogs were not any where near the coyotes!

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  7. Great pictures!

    I have added a link to my "wordy" blog to the link up - let me know if it contains enough pictures!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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