Monday, 3 August 2015

Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland – 2015 Road Trip, Day Eight

Whilst on the road l kept a daily journal, where l used a number of different approaches to record our trip.  I've found that together with our photographs, it makes a great record of our adventure. For the next couple of weeks I'll share how our trip through south-western Queensland unfolded. I hope you enjoy tagging along with us.


Saturday, 27th June 2015
Carnarvon Gorge National Park

The best things about Carnarvon Gorge


Chrisy
 
1. The sandstone cliffs
 
Sandstone cliffs of Carnarvon Gorge

 
2. No internet or mobile reception for five days
 
Peaceful palms at Carnarvon Gorge
 
3. Night drinks with the neighbours
 
Carnarvon Gorge campsite

 
4. The view from Boolimbah Bluff
 
Looking down into Carnarvon Gorge from above

 
5. The tiny child handprints at the art gallery

Aboriginal rock art at Carnarvon Gorge
 
Bella
 
1. Making friends with Dylan and Braydon.
 
Making friends at Carnarvon Gorge
 
2. Watching movies at night with my new friends
 
Campsite friendships at Carnarvon Gorge
 
3. Walking the nature trail
 
View of Carnarvon Creek

 
4. Looking at the rock art
 
Aboriginal rock art at Carnarvon Gorge

 
5. Seeing kangaroos
 
 Eastern Grey Kangaroo
 
Dan
 
1.  Time out
 
Nature watching at Carnarvon Creek

 
2. All the bushwalks
 
Warrumbah Gorge at Carnarvon

 
3. Walking Boolimbah Bluff with Jason and then with the girls.

Walking track to Boolimbah Bluff
 
Road Trip Map


The details.
Carnarvon Gorge is one of Australia's iconic natural features.  Located around 700km north west of Brisbane, it is one of Queensland's most well loved destinations.  The Gorge is an amazing oasis in an otherwise, semi-arid landscape, carved from sandstone by water and time.  A walking track takes you up the Gorge which is about 30km long, with a number of side trips available to explore side gorges and canyons.  It is a rich and spiritual place, full of diverse plants and animals and evidence of Aboriginal habitation.
There are a number of accommodation options at Carnarvon Gorge. We chose to stay at the camping ground within the National Park.  This camping area is only open during the school holidays, and not through Summer.  You will need to book ahead, especially for the caravan and camping trailer spots, but it is worth it.  The camping ground is well equipped, even with hot showers, and is by far the cheapest and best option if you prefer not to camp in a caravan park.

Sunday, 2 August 2015

Portraits of my daughter - the 52 project (28/52) & (29/52)

{the 52 project}
A portrait of my daughter, once a week, every week, in 2015. 
Linking up with Jodi from Practising Simplicity.  

28/52



Dylan and Braydon.  We might just remember these boys, and your friendship forever. My dear, you fell for Dylan, hook line and sinker, you were smitten.
 
29/52
 
 
You.  On this day you walked 11 kilometres up Carnarvon Gorge.  You surprised us all, and quite possibly even yourself. You are amazing.  
 
 

Saturday, 1 August 2015

Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland – 2015 Road Trip, Day Seven

Whilst on the road l kept a daily journal, where l used a number of different approaches to record our trip.  I've found that together with our photographs, it makes a great record of our adventure. For the next couple of weeks I'll share how our trip through south-western Queensland unfolded. I hope you enjoy tagging along with our journey.  


Sunday, 28th June 2015
Carnarvon Gorge National Park

The spirituality of Carnarvon

Today we walked 11 kilometres (return) to visit an Aboriginal Rock Art site up the Gorge. The 62 meter long sandstone wall is said to contain over 2,000 engravings, ochre stencils and free hand paintings. 

Welcome sign at the Art Gallery site

The Art Gallery site at Carnarvon Gorge.

To stand there and observe the artwork drawn thousands of years ago was very moving.  In particular the stencils of tiny children hands moved me to tears.  Little children, just like Bella, had stood there so many years ago and had their handprints immortalised in ochre.

Hand_stencils_at_Carnarvon_Gorge
 
Stencils of hands and boomerangs

It made me think of what their lives were like, how they lived their days, and that they had no idea what pain and suffering lay ahead for their people.
Amongst the towering cliffs, bubbling creek and gnarled old tress l'm sure their spirits continue.

Carnarvon Creek

On the walk in l saw a man sitting by himself, enjoying the view.  I commented on what a beautiful spot he had found and he replied he was just thinking about how lucky he was.
And indeed we are.........
 

The Art Gallery site at Carnarvon Gorge
 

Road Trip Map
The details.
Carnarvon Gorge is one of Australia's iconic natural features.  Located around 700km north west of Brisbane, it is one of Queensland's most well loved destinations.  The Gorge is an amazing oasis in an otherwise, semi-arid landscape, carved from sandstone by water and time.  A walking track takes you up the Gorge which is about 30km long, with a number of side trips available to explore side gorges and canyons.  It is a rich and spiritual place, full of diverse plants and animals and evidence of Aboriginal habitation.
There are a number of accommodation options at Carnarvon Gorge. We chose to stay at the camping ground within the National Park.  This camping area is only open during the school holidays, and not through Summer.  You will need to book ahead, especially for the caravan and camping trailer spots, but it is worth it.  The camping ground is well equipped, even with hot showers, and is by far the cheapest and best option if you prefer not to camp in a caravan park.


Friday, 31 July 2015

Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland – 2015 Road Trip, Day Six

Whilst on the road l kept a daily journal, where l used a number of different approaches to record our trip.  I've found that together with our photographs, it makes a great record of our adventure. For the next couple of weeks I'll share how our trip through south-western Queensland unfolded. I hope you enjoy tagging along with us.


Saturday, 27th June 2015
Carnarvon Gorge National Park

Finding your tribe

Campsite Uno championships

Making friends at the campsite

What wonderful people we have around us in the National Park campground.  We arrived at the same time as our closest neighbours and we quickly introduced ourselves.  The campground within Carnarvon National Park is only available during the school holidays and we all arrived the first day it opened.
Across the road is Denise and Jason with the two boys, Dylan and Braydon.  They're on their way to the Kimberley and the Top End on a three month adventure.  Bella formed such a strong friendship with the two boys almost instantly.
Next to us is an older couple, Graham and Ruth, and believe it or not Graham grew up just down the road from where we live!
Both families share very similar interests, values and beliefs.
It's uncanny how we were all thrown together.  I think l've found my tribe!


Road Trip Map
The details.
Carnarvon Gorge is one of Australia's iconic natural features.  Located around 700km north west of Brisbane, it is one of Queensland's most well loved destinations.  The Gorge is an amazing oasis in an otherwise, semi-arid landscape, carved from sandstone by water and time.  A walking track takes you up the Gorge which is about 30km long, with a number of side trips available to explore side gorges and canyons.  It is a rich and spiritual place, full of diverse plants and animals and evidence of Aboriginal habitation.
There are a number of accommodation options at Carnarvon Gorge. We chose to stay at the camping ground within the National Park.  This camping area is only open during the school holidays, and not through Summer.  You will need to book ahead, especially for the caravan and camping trailer spots, but it is worth it.  The camping ground is well equipped, even with hot showers, and is by far the cheapest and best option if you prefer not to camp in a caravan park.

Wednesday, 29 July 2015

King Parrots and Crimson Rosellas - Reconnect with Nature

{reconnect with nature}

A community of like minded people who see the value in understanding and appreciating the natural world.  Each week we step outside, find some nature, photograph it and learn something about it to share with others.  Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need and together we'll reconnect with nature, one photograph at time. 
 Read more about the Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time idea here.

 
Mountain parrots - feeding King Parrots and Crimson Rosellas at Queen Mary Falls  
 
One of the highlights of our first stop on our recent road trip, was the chance to get up close and personal with the local birds.  At the Queen Mary Falls Caravan Park they offer tourists seed to feed to the birds.  It quickly became obvious that this is a very popular pastime, as the birds were very used to humans and quick to approach us in hope of food.    


Male King Parrot

Who's a pretty boy? A male King Parrot (identified by his striking red head) greets us as we cross the road to the kiosk.
I have mixed feelings about feeding wild birds.  It can result in a number of problems, but l've got to admit this was a lot of fun.

Feeding King Parrots and Crimson Rosella

There were only two species present, both Australian native parrots that are common in the wet mountain forests found along the Great Dividing Range.  In the photo above Dan has both species on him, the King Parrot and Crimson Rosella.  On his shoulder is a female King Parrot which can be identified by her solid green head.  On his right hand feeding is a sub-adult male King Parrot - you can see his characteristic bright red head is just coming through in patches.  And on Dan's left hand is a Crimson Rosella. 


Female King Parrot
A female King Parrot stops by to say hello and left a calling card in my hair afterwards, much to Bella's enjoyment!
Australia is known for its rich diversity of parrots, and is home to just under a quarter of the world's species.  In total 56 different parrot species are found in Australia, and only five of these are found elsewhere in the world.  In Australia parrots have adapted to a wide range of habitats and can be found in the tropical rainforest of Far North Queensland, to the arid, open deserts of Central Australia and even in the cold, mountainous areas of Tasmania. 

King Parrots and Crimson Rosellas feeding
 
Normally these birds fly past so quickly, darting in and out of the treetops or sometimes we might see a Crimson Rosella on the side of the road whilst driving over the Range.  I loved the chance to see them up so close, and they kept us amused for a long time.   

King Parrot

Back at the campsite we tipped out the rest of our seed, and l set my camera down on the ground to capture they action.  Soon after someone came over to investigate.

Crimson Rosella and King Parrot
 
With a friend he got closer and closer.
 
King Parrot
 
Until he could almost touch the camera!   


 
Such beautiful birds and a great way to Reconnect with Nature.
 
Hope you've all had a chance to get outside this week and reconnect with nature.  Looking forward to seeing all your photographs.

Note to readers participating in the link up.

Please use the following points as a guide:
  • Share with us something you've noticed in nature. 
  • Only share one post per week, and link to that post rather than your general blog address.
  • If you can, please include something about your find that allows us all to learn more about the world around us. Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need.
  • Visit as many links as you can, amazing things are shared every week.  
  • And finally, please include a link back to Living a Good North Coast Life in your post

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland – 2015 Road Trip, Day Five

Whilst on the road l kept a daily journal, where l used a number of different approaches to record our trip.  I've found that together with our photographs, it makes a great record of our adventure. For the next couple of weeks I'll share how our trip through south-western Queensland unfolded. I hope you enjoy tagging along with our journey.  


Friday, 26th June 2015
Roma - Injune - Carnarvon Gorge National Park


First impressions of Carnarvon Gorge

It's very much an oasis, nestled in otherwise arid grazing country.


Carnarvon Creek


Those cliff faces are awe inspiring, towering high above, with striking pale sandstone faces.


The palms and cycads remind me of the Top End.

 
Palms at Carnarvon Gorge

 
Excited to learn that Aboriginal people have described Carnarvon as a place of learning - an area of great spirituality. 

Rock art at Carnarvon Gorge

The sound of the hundreds, probably thousands of birds that live along the creek and up the gorge make this constant chattering sound in the background.

Carnarvon Creek

Camping within the National Park was a great decision.  It's cheaper and the grey nomads are gone! 
 
Carnarvon Gorge National Park camping ground
 
We've got lovely neighbours either side and Bella has already made some friends.
 
Children playing at Carnarvon Gorge
 

Road Trip Map
The details.
Carnarvon Gorge is one of Australia's iconic natural features.  Located around 700km north west of Brisbane, it is one of Queensland's most well loved destinations.  The Gorge is an amazing oasis in an otherwise, semi-arid landscape, carved from sandstone by water and time.  A walking track takes you up the Gorge which is about 30km long, with a number of side trips available to explore side gorges and canyons.  It is a rich and spiritual place, full of diverse plants and animals and evidence of Aboriginal habitation.
There are a number of accommodation options at Carnarvon Gorge. We chose to stay at the camping ground within the National Park.  This camping area is only open during the school holidays, and not through Summer.  You will need to book ahead, especially for the caravan and camping trailer spots, but it is worth it.  The camping ground is well equipped, even with hot showers, and is by far the cheapest and best option if you prefer not to camp in a caravan park.    
 

Monday, 27 July 2015

Roma, Queensland – 2015 Road Trip, Day Four

Whilst on the road l kept a daily journal, where l use a number of different approaches to record our trip.  I've found that together with our photographs, it makes a great record of our adventure.


Thursday, 25th June 2015
Crows Nest National Park - Toowoomba - Dalby - Chinchilla - Miles - Roma


Proud that the Northern Rivers is Coal Seam Gas free

CSG free Northern Rivers

Driving west from Toowoomba we gradually saw more and more evidence of mining and Coal Seam Gas extraction.  The Surat Basin is a well known Coal Seam Gas area, and one l have heard much of at home.

Where we drove along the main highway, we only saw a few wells in the distance, and little change at all to the landscape - well apart from one water body that was signposted with warning signs. What l did notice was how an otherwise rural and agricultural landscape was quite industrialised.
 
Almost every second or third car was from a gas company, including both Origin and Santos, with their orange flashing lights on top of the cabins.  Every side road had signs for different rigs.  People in high vis clothing crawled over every little town and village.  And the demountable buildings!  These are the temporary accommodation provided to the workers on site, and we saw SO many being trucked to new destinations.  On the outskirts of Roma we saw two storage or holding areas containing thousands of them!

It was this strange mix of being out in a typical western landscape, but whilst also like being in Western Australia (where mining activities see to dominate everything). 

After just a small taste l am glad the Northern Rivers is Coal Seam Gas free and justly proud of our communities efforts.


Road Trip Map
The details.
Roma is a regional country town, about 500km west of Brisbane.  For us Roma was a pit stop before heading north to Carnarvon National Park for five nights.  It has all the modern facilities and conveniences you need, and is a worthwhile stop in its own right.  The CBD area is dotted with historic buildings and its streets are lined with 100 year old Bottle Trees, planted in memory of the local men who served in World War 1.