Sunday, 29 March 2015

the 52 project - 13/52

{the 52 project}
A portrait of my daughter, once a week, every week, in 2015. 
Linking up with Jodi from Practising Simplicity.  

13/52


Some more photos from our recent stay at the Clarence Wilderness Lodge.  You were so excited to use the canoes, and rightly explained that it was something you've never done before. So here you are paddling with your Dad in the Upper Clarence, making memories that hopefully will last a lifetime.

Wednesday, 25 March 2015

Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time

{reconnect with nature}

A community of like minded people who see the value in understanding and appreciating the natural world.  Each week we step outside, find some nature, photograph it and learn something about it to share with others.  Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need and together we'll reconnect with nature, one photograph at time. 
 Read more about the Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time idea here.

 
A very special sighting, Brush-tailed Rock Wallabies (Petrogale penicillata) basking in the sunshine

During out recent visit to the Clarence River Wilderness Lodge, we were extremely lucky enough to spot some Brush-tailed Rock Wallabies.  It was only last year that l saw my first Rock Wallaby , whilst camping further upstream at Boonoo Boonoo.  At that time l learnt that the entire population, which stretches along the Great Dividing Range from Victoria in the south to Queensland in the north, is only estimated to be between 15,000 and 30,000 individuals. 
Like the iconic Koala and Platypus, Brush-tailed Rock Wallabies were once abundant and widespread.  But in the early 1900's, hundreds of thousands were shot as agricultural pests or hunted for fur. Their numbers have continued to fall, until today they mainly exist as fragmented populations in national parks and reserves.
Seeing both of my Brush-tailed Rock Wallaby sightings were in the Upper Clarence catchment, l went searching for more details on the local population.  It turns out that about 80% of the entire Australian population exists in our region, with the area we visited a known stronghold.  
The Rock Wallaby is so called because it lives mainly on rocky outcrops and cliff ledges in rugged and steep country.  There they eat, sleep and raise their joeys.  The owners of the Lodge suggested that Rocky Wallabies are often seen on the rocky outcrops across the river from the camping ground where they like to bask in the morning sunlight. 



We were given the advice to listen out of the sound of falling rocks in the morning, and then search the outcrops for the Wallabies.  And sure enough, see them we did.




What an incredible sighting, and how lucky we are to live in an area rich with wildlife.

Hope you've all had a chance to get outside this week and reconnect with nature.  Looking forward to seeing all your photographs.  


Note to readers participating in the link up.

Please use the following points as a guide: 

  • Share with us something you've noticed in nature.  
  • Only share one post per week, and link to that post rather than your general blog address. 
  • If you can, please include something about your find that allows us all to learn more about the world around us. Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need.
  • Visit as many links as you can, amazing things are shared every week.   
  • And finally, please include a link back to Living a Good North Coast Life in your post.

Sunday, 22 March 2015

the 52 project - 12/52

{the 52 project}
A portrait of my daughter, once a week, every week, in 2015. 
Linking up with Jodi from Practising Simplicity.  

12/52


Some of my fondest childhood moments are of swimming in creeks and rivers just like this.  How  wonderful that l'm now able to share the same pleasures with you.  It's like coming full circle.   

Wednesday, 18 March 2015

Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time

{reconnect with nature}

A community of like minded people who see the value in understanding and appreciating the natural world.  Each week we step outside, find some nature, photograph it and learn something about it to share with others.  Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need and together we'll reconnect with nature, one photograph at time. 
 Read more about the Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time idea here.

 
Bumping into a few Goannas (Varanus varius)

Last weekend we enjoyed a quick overnight stay at the Clarence River Wilderness Lodge. The Lodge is nestled up on the Great Dividing Range, which is a mountain range a couple of hours to our west.  

It's very different country up there. The Great Dividing Range is Australia's most substantial mountain range, stretching right along the country's eastern coastline.  Here on the North Coast the range rises sharply, and the difference in elevation between the coastal strip (where most of us live) and the mountains is dramatic.  To give you an idea, where we now live is around 10 meters above sea level, and the Lodge is at least 400 meters. 

Whilst there we saw a few different native animals, including one that made these tracks.  


It's one of our local Monitors, or a Goanna as we Australians like to call them.


Goannas can be a fairly common sight at campsites, as they're born scavengers.  Come night they'll raid your food supplies or unsecured rubbish in hope of an easy feed.

 
And they can climb trees.  This where they conduct a lot of their predatory hunting, raiding nest and hollows to feed upon small mammals, birds and their eggs.


I think most Australian's have a healthy deal of respect for the old Goanna, and rightly so.  They're a powerful animals with sharp claws and teeth.  But like most native animals, given the option they'd much rather retreat away from humans.  


Even by the time l'd taken these photos he was hissing and fluffing out the skin under his chin. Telling me enough, was enough.   

Hope you've all had a chance to get outside this week and reconnect with nature.  Looking forward to seeing all your photographs.  

Note to readers participating in the link up.

Please use the following points as a guide: 

  • Share with us something you've noticed in nature.  
  • Only share one post per week, and link to that post rather than your general blog address. 
  • If you can, please include something about your find that allows us all to learn more about the world around us. Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need.
  • Visit as many links as you can, amazing things are shared every week.   
  • And finally, please include a link back to Living a Good North Coast Life in your post.

 

Sunday, 15 March 2015

the 52 project - 11/52

{the 52 project}
A portrait of my daughter, once a week, every week, in 2015. 
Linking up with Jodi from Practising Simplicity.  

11/52

Just back from a great weekend away.  Last night we stayed at the Clarence Wilderness Lodge, nestled right up on the Great Dividing Range.  It was a chance to give our pop-top camper a test run, but also an opportunity to spend some much needed time in nature.  Out in the elements, with the environment all around you, is where you shine. 

Wednesday, 11 March 2015

Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time

{reconnect with nature}

A community of like minded people who see the value in understanding and appreciating the natural world.  Each week we step outside, find some nature, photograph it and learn something about it to share with others.  Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need and together we'll reconnect with nature, one photograph at time. 
 Read more about the Reconnect with Nature - one photograph at a time idea here.

 
Feeding in the treetops

There's been an explosion of activity in our Poinciana tree this week.   

Our Poinciana tree is the one that is closest to our house and the one we look out on from the kitchen window and the veranda.  It's a massive tree, and from our second storey you actually look out into its canopy.        



That makes it really easy to watch what's happening.

And normally it's not much, just a few of our resident birds that flit in and out of the branches.

But this week, with almost military precision, a family of Figbirds and our resident Magpie-larks have been raiding the tree.  At first we were wondering what they were after, and then we saw they were feeding on small green caterpillars. 

Man, those Figbirds move fast.  I've tried for days to get a decent shot of them feeding in the tree, and they really don't sit still for long!



 
Here's one of the females, looking for food high up in the canopy.  


Another shot of a female.   


And one of the males.

It's been a delight to watch them dart around and expertly find the green caterpillars. They've been at it for days now, which makes you wonder just how many caterpillars there are on the tree! Must be hundreds truly.

Hope you've all had a chance to get outside this week and reconnect with nature.  Looking forward to seeing all your photographs.  

Note to readers participating in the link up.

Please use the following points as a guide: 
  • Share with us something you've noticed in nature.  
  • Only share one post per week, and link to that post rather than your general blog address. 
  • If you can, please include something about your find that allows us all to learn more about the world around us. Just a few sentences about the tree you’ve photographed, or the bird you've seen, or how you’re noticing the seasons change is all you need.
  • Visit as many links as you can, amazing things are shared every week.   
  • And finally, please include a link back to Living a Good North Coast Life in your post.

Sunday, 8 March 2015

the 52 project - 10/52

{the 52 project}
A portrait of my daughter, once a week, every week, in 2015. 
Linking up with Jodi from Practising Simplicity.  

10/52


The rain continues to fall in our rain gauge.  I snapped this one during the recent wet weather, and l love how it captures your great sense of humour.  You truly are a funny kid Bella, and make us laugh every day with your antics.  Never loose that darling, you'll find out soon enough that life can be way too serious.